Category Archives: twitter

Always Assume The Worst

Today, Major League Baseball teams, in support of GLAAD Spirit Day, changed the avatars of the Facebook and Twitter pages with many posting messages of support for day’s goal of raising awareness to help reduce bullying of LGBT youth. The hashtag of #spiritday was also utilized. 

Frames of avatars were the color purple. 

As you can imagine, responses from numerous fan bases were, well, not so positive.

A brand can have the best and well thought out intent with any type of crowd sourcing or promotion of an initiative. But it is critical to think of one thing with any posting, and that is “what’s the worst response that we could get, and will that response overshadow the intent of this messaging?”

A prime example was McDonald’s #MCDStories, which did not end well

In this case, the responses probably overshadowed the intent of MLB teams. This should not discourage anyone from postings that will generate a large amount of response, but the key is to bear in mind the worst possible backlash that could come. 

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Social Media Job Search Pointers

It usually happens almost as if it is on clockwork.

When I tell people what I do for a living and what brand I do it for, the question quickly follows: “How’d you get into doing that?”

Of course, this is also when there’s the assumption that working in social media is not much more than getting to hang out on Facebook and Twitter all day, but if you work in social media in any way, you likely know there is far more to it than that.

But social media jobs, especially within sports, can be compared to gold bullion. Everyone wants them, but they are not many of them out there to be had. Still, this is May, and odds are that there is another crop of college graduates eyeing jobs within sports and social media. Here are a few pointers to get on your way to a job within sports and social media.

1. Write, write and write!

Find a way to write, however you can. It may be with a freelance publication, someone who may need help with a Web site or even a blog. A critical part of social media is written content that is clear, concise and compelling. Find ways to write, and it can help immensely in polishing your writing and communications ability.

2. Observe

Like and follow as many brands as you can. Almost put together a list, sometimes written down of a wish list for what you’d like to see a brand do and perhaps look at a social media strategy and come up with ways to tweak it for your own use.

3. Twitter Chats

One of the most invaluable tools for those within and looked to be within many industries are Twitter chats, where you can more or less talk shop and exchange best practices with others who are experienced within their fields. #smsportschat and #sbchat are must-dos if you want to get plugged in within sports and social media.

4. Get Experience, However It Comes

Social media can at times be a hybrid position, depending on your brand. It’s not uncommon for it to have a tie-in to marketing, sponsorship, ticket sales, facility operations and more. Volunteer to help out, even if it means helping an area of a sports team or organization in one of its lowest levels. It’ll help you gain a great understanding of how entire organizations work and not just one area.

5. Be a Fan! 

In the end, a lot of social media is about connecting with fans. Don’t forget to be one! Now, it’s important, in a large way not to look at social media as getting to hang out with (insert your favorite team here). But it’s vital to never forget what it is like to be one of those of which you are trying to reach and connect with. 

Go to a game as a fan every now and then. Even if you ‘know’ someone who can get you great seats with a parking pass, avoid it. Sit in the cheap seats, eat the stadium food and pay for parking. Remember what it’s like to be that diehard fan.

Burger King’s golden opportunity

If you were close to anything social media-wise Monday, it’s a pretty safe bet that you heard about Burger King’s twitter account being hacked and instantly rebranded with McDonald’s likenesses with some rather colorful and unflattering tweets being sent out from the fast-food chain’s official twitter account. 

Like most social media events, attempts at humor by those across the twitterverse became part of the story.

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But going forward will be the most intriguing part of the the BK crisis. It’s a safe bet Burger King wasn’t on as many individual’s social media radar on Monday morning. This crisis changed that with a very quick rise in followers. It’s funny…a crisis like this grows your audience whereas an ill-timed tweet for other brands does the exact opposite. 

Burger King now has a captive audience and all eyes are on it. Going nearly four hours after the hacking to release a statement certainly raised some eyebrows at first. 

Bottom line – all eyes are on Burger King now within Twitter – there’s a golden opportunity to turn a negative to positive. It’ll sure be interesting to see if it propels the BK brand into a greater prominence that it could have envisioned. 

 

 

Social media lessons from ‘Nashville’

Within our household, ABC’s “Nashville” has become a favorite, either to watch live or catch up on later via DVR.

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As one working within social media, there are always instances which arise that can be applied to connecting audiences online. That happened this week.

This past week, one of the characters, Julliette Barnes (played by Hayden Pantierre) injected herself into the midst of a social media crossroads, one of which is very familiar to anyone managing a social brand.

Barnes went ‘off-script’ during a concert. After asking to see tweets about the concert, many negative, Barnes initially was taken aback. Later, however, she was referred to a video with overwhelmingly positive reviews.

The point is this. When you run a social media brand, especially when it’s only a few handle the messaging, it’s easy to take what is said about a brand personal. You are on the front line – you are excited to pass along the good but cower when being charred by the bad. It’s easy to be trapped into taking it way too personal.

But it’s always important to step back and look at the big picture. In social media, everyone has a voice, and odds are it’ll be on both ends of the spectrum no matter what you do. The key, however, is the embrace all facets of a social community.

The importance of being spontaneous

Fair or not, one of the most talked-about things from the Super Bowl will the 34-minute long power outage at the Super Dome.

Any time so many people watching an event have a diversion like that, things become downright entertaining on social media with countless individuals taking attempts at humor in light of the situation. The Packers – Seahawks ending this past season the the jet drawer explosion in the Daytona 500 come to mind, at first thought.

The key, for social brands, is to loosen up and get away from the structure and calling an audible, if you will. Here are some of the better ways brands capitalized on a very captive social audience. Major kudos to Oreo for the sharable content, too. It was retweeted more than 12,000 times within three hours, according to Buzzfeed.

Here are some of the better reactions to the black out, via USAtoday.com

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Turning a Tweet-Hack Into a Positive

Within NASCAR, Mark Martin has been one of the latest to both embrace and see a massive fan reaction thanks to Twitter. He joined earlier this year and has received numerous followers. Part of that is because Martin appears to ‘Get it” on Twitter – answering fans questions and even talk about his tastes in rap music!

This past weekend, however, Martin fell victim to what many of us do on social networking sites. He was hacked. His account sent out peculiar messages and his twitter name was changed to “Epic Swag”

Well, after recovering his account, Martin is now back online. But Hack Gate isn’t finished.

This weekend at NASCAR’s race at Auto Club Speedway in California, the roof panel of Martin’s car, which bears his name, will have a different look.

Instead of saying ‘Mark Martin,’ it, for this race, will read, ‘Epic Swag’

Well played, Mr. Swag. Well played. 

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